Incontinent Youth

My children have all grown up, the youngest is 29. I can’t recall any of them wearing diapers beyond the age of about two. Wandering through a supermarket the other day, I noticed diapers for 8 to 14-year-olds!

I couldn’t believe it and as soon as I could… I hit the internet. It didn’t take long to turn up a plethora of sites on the subject—everything from medical discussions on why this phenomenon had occurred to a forum that discussed which was better for day wear, diapers or pull-ups! I’m not kidding http://bit.ly/2iim3Qi. Several comments in this forum scream for more commentary or psychological therapy, but I’ll pass.

On the medical side, many doctors attribute “incontinence” among school age children with autism or ADHD. On his deathbed, the doctor who “discovered” ADHD claimed it to be a fictitious disease (http://bit.ly/2iX46HX). Or, as Dr. Edward C. Hamlyn, Royal College of General Practitioners, called it “ADHD is fraud intended to justify starting children on a life of drug addiction.” Who would benefit from such a fiction? My best guess is Big Pharma.

Imagine that! A made up disease designed to increase the profits of the pharmaceutical industry. Could this be true? Oh, hell yeah. But there are thousands of children that have not been diagnosed with autism or ADHD and still wet the bed beyond age 8 and 10. If, as I suspect, Big Pharma and its subset industry, Health and Welfare are the villains, how did they do it? To justify an entire product line, the industry would require a large consumer need… something in the range of a few million across the United States alone.

I have long believed the food industry and Big Pharma to be working hand in hand. The food industry provides fake food, enriched with shit that makes a person sick, and Big Pharma provides the medicines that cure the symptoms but not the underlying problem… bad food.
Meanwhile, we have an entire generation of children wearing diapers into their teens. Anyone out there believe that will not create even more psychological problems? I don’t doubt it for a minute.

Perhaps a lack of active parenting, enhanced by outside influences, contributes to the problem of incontinence among our youth. Under the stresses of time and finance, providing a healthy diet for our children has become increasingly difficult. Many parents can’t afford the doctor visits and lab tests to determine whether a physical issue is at the root of the problem, to say nothing of the costs for psychotherapy.

What I find mind-boggling is the normalcy now associated with youth incontinence. As with hyper active or emotionally withdrawn children, where the tendency is to diagnose and prescribe drugs to treat the symptoms without looking for the root of the problem, youth incontinence has become routine and the symptoms treated with diapers and/or pull-ups. This is quickly followed by a shrug of parental shoulders and convincing themselves that it’s “normal” these days for a child to wet the bed past the age of eight!

Well… to my mind bed wetting beyond the age of three is NOT normal. But, as I stated at the beginning, I no longer have children this young so I can’t truly relate to the problem. My sense is that combinations of diet, environment, and corporate profiteering have left parents helpless to combat this Gordian knot. Still, helpless is as helpless does and I applaud those parents who don’t accept the norm and dig deeper for a solution.

What do you think?

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